Tesla - Electric cars, trucks and other technologies. — Bulb Community

Tesla - Electric cars, trucks and other technologies.

edited November 19 in Everything but Bulb
I'm surprised there hasn't been a Tesla thread on these forums yet so maybe it's time to start one!

I presume by now everyone's seen their announcements for the Tesla Semi, and 2nd generation Tesla Roadster (links here and here if you haven't).

Also they've opened a new Supercharger lounge which you need a code from your Tesla to gain entry to (the code changes daily). Looks maybe a bit too clinical but quite nice anyway.

Anyone on here got a Tesla car? Powerwall?
Anyone aspiring to get one?


Sadly I currently live on a terrace with no possibility of charging at home, limited roof space for solar and batteries, and a medium to high possibility of waking up to find scratches down the side of a car that fancy.

Comments

  • mowcius,

    We have a £1000 deposit down for a Tesla 3 but are having very serious thoughts about whether we will continue given delivery of RHD vehicles has now slipped to 2019. We are also disappointed that the much hyped 300 mile range now proves to be a $9000 extra.

    I strongly believe in the EV concept as part of a drive to 'saving the planet' but not at any cost and a Tesla 3 is an expensive beast.

    I admire Elon Musk but the bottom line is that if the likes of VW decide to get serious about EV's (and it does look like they are moving that way) then their financial clout and R&D capability will leave Tesla for dead.

    The Nissan Leaf is available now as is the Renault Zoe and both have the range of the Tesla 3 at 180 miles. We have ordered a Zoe which is due delivery at the end of February. We are buying on a PCP contract (a first for us) as EV's are such developing technology much should have changed in terms of mileage and choice of models in three years time. Hopefully the Government will extend its scrappage scheme past December 31st.

    There will be issues as our main property is 35 miles outside Aberdeen and my wife/ boys live, predominantly, in the flat IN Aberdeen during school terms. The development has no charging points and I guess it will be sometime before it does (we're raising at the annual owners meeting on the 28th). Aberdeen City Council are quite proactive and are rolling out a number of charge points and we do have one about 10 minutes walk away fro the flat. My wife works for the council and we have reported an issue with non EV's parking in EV bays so the City Wardens can monitor and issue tickets as necessary. Inverurie now has 8 publically accessible charge points. We will have to see how it goes when the car turns up!!

    The HomeCharge site survey will be happening later today to determine what needs to be done to install a charge point here at home. I had hoped to use the old electric shower part of the consumer unit in the house to power this. Unfortunately the supply for the EV charger unit has to come from the non-RCD side of the main consumer unit. We live in an old farmhouse and the meter and main consumer unit are on the far side of the outbuildings. This will entail the fitting of a isolation switch on the far side and the running of a 45 metre cable (means digging up the drive outside the back door (again) to get the power cable to where we want the charger installing. Fortunately the Scottish Government provide another £500 over the OLEV £500 to have a charge point installed.

    We are a 'green' household. We have 4kW of PV (although in Aberdeenshire it doesn't have the yield it would if we lived in Cornwall) and a 60 tube Solar ET system coupled to a CTC ground source heat pump.

    I have been looking at a battery storage system but because it (apparently) has to be installed by recognised installers a large part of the profitability is taken up by labour costs. I'll be honest we installed the Solar PV, solar ET and GSHP whilst taking full advantage of assorted interest free loans, FIT and RHI payments. OK so the Government have reduced VAT on battery installs but it does need more financial support to promote 'mass' takeup.

    I know that any PV expansion here would have to go through a G59/ 3 certified inverter so could easily install it myself. SSE have approved a 1.65kW extension but want to charge £590 to approve my 'new' installer as they aren't SSE approved (I believe that's why they want to charge me). This just makes the expansion project a non-starter. They also won't tell me how much they will allow me to extend the system by. I know I'm on a single phase but I'd like to buy an inverter to allow for further expansion. SSE are not making this easy.

    Regards

    Richard
  • edited November 20
    Hi Richard (@linesrg), very interesting, thanks for the post!
    I admire Elon Musk but the bottom line is that if the likes of VW decide to get serious about EV's (and it does look like they are moving that way) then their financial clout and R&D capability will leave Tesla for dead.
    I've heard this said a few times and I have to admit I'm not convinced.

    I will admit that other companies may (currently) have more cash to splash but I don't think Tesla is short on R&D, especially not in regards to electric vehicles. There's a reason why they've just managed to announce a viable fully electric truck and the fastest production road car in the world; they have some of the best engineers in the world working on their technologies.

    I think where they still fall down right now is production facilities. With the gigafactory, they've in theory got that covered but it sounds like it's still having serious teething problems right now.
    I suspect every other manufacturer is at least going to be behind on battery production costs once it's fully operational.


    Do you watch Fully Charged?
  • At the moment anything electric is not affordable for me, but I am keeping a close eye on Auto Trader as I want to make the jump as soon as it is viable for me to do so.

    A second hand Zoe or Leaf will probably be the first electric car I own or lease. The only thing that puts me off the Zoe at the moment (they are going for about £5,000 on Auto Trader) is the separate battery lease, which wouldn't make it very competitive for me compared to the cost of the petrol I would put in. I appreciate why Renault did this, but now that people can see that the batteries do actually last, and even if they don't, the costs of replacing them are coming down, I don't think myself (and many others) will be far off making the switch, especially if they remove the leasing requirements.
  • edited November 20
    @matthew744 Renault do now offer the zoe without the battery lease but it'll no doubt be a few years before they hit AutoTrader.

    Interestingly their slightly stingy 100k miles/6 year battery warranty is down to a measly 66% capacity.
    Considering a Model S taxi has done over 250k miles with only 7% degredation (over 3 years) and separately 200k miles with 6% degredation (over 2 years. They've done 300k since but I can't find battery degredation stats), I'd have hoped that manufacturers would be offering better warranties by now.

    To me that shows a lack of faith in their own battery technology which would worry me if I was looking to buy one.

    Coupled with the earlier model leaf's appauling battery situation, I don't know what to make of buying either second hand unless you're just a short journey city driver.

    Tesla's announcement of their semi truck drivertrain being guaranteed against breakdown for 1M miles further increases my suspicion that they really are miles ahead of the competition in the technologies that really matter, whatever snazzy features other manufacturers are trying to cram in for budget prices.
  • I just found out that our new build has 4.2kWp solar panels (25 sqm coverage maxing at just under 40,000 kWh per year). I love the idea of a power bank and electric car. A friend of mine just paid £100k for a model X.

    Right now we have three cars (well a VW camper and two cars) but I'm keen to sell both cars and get something electric in the next few years.
  • edited November 20
    @brooky_agb, there are plenty of electric VW bus conversions around! The most well known probably being this guy who is also basically the oracle on DIY powerwalls.

    I used to install home cinemas for a living so there was a Model S outside the office most days... Oh how I drooled :mrgreen:
  • Cool, thanks for the link.
  • edited November 20
    And right on cue, to go along with my love of tiny houses comes this gem from Tesla:

    https://www.tesla.com/teslatinyhouse

    Who else wants one?

    Just stick a bed in there and I'd be happy forever.
  • mowcius said:

    And right on cue, to go along with my love of tiny houses comes this gem from Tesla:

    https://www.tesla.com/teslatinyhouse

    Who else wants one?

    Just stick a bed in there and I'd be happy forever.

    That is very cool. I wonder how much the panels will be able to charge to model X each day. They seem pretty confident that they can get all around Oz with it alone.
  • edited November 21

    That is very cool. I wonder how much the panels will be able to charge to model X each day. They seem pretty confident that they can get all around Oz with it alone.

    I suspect with the timescales they've been working to, they'll have been using Superchargers (which are still meant to be 100% renewable energy) along the way to keep the car charged.
    The hardest trips would have been going from Brisbane to Adelaide and then over to Sydney in a relatively short space of time.
    Going to Adelaide, there are no superchargers within battery range so they presumably would have to have stopped somewhere to charge, and with those panels being optimistically 3kW (based on single panels that I can find being at max about 400W) it would have taken a few days to charge a Model X back up to full.
  • @mowcius yeah but maybe they were by a beach and took a few days off their hectic schedule to swing from a hammock, thereby re-charging both physical and emotional batteries
  • edited November 23
    mowcius said:

    @matthew744 Interestingly their slightly stingy 100k miles/6 year battery warranty is down to a measly 66% capacity.

    That's the end of my interest in the Zoe then - looks like I'd be better off with a Leaf.

    I found plenty of positive reviews online from owners, including a 100,000 mile taxi that has had barely any battery degradation: https://www.zap-map.com/electric-taxi-company-clocks-100000-miles-in-nissan-leaf/

    I couldn't find any comparable reviews from Zoe owners...
  • @matthew744 done my own reading lately and I'd definitely sway towards the Leaf. It's the best selling EV in the UK for a good reason.

    I almost put a deposit down on one for £11k last weekend, but given the new model is out soon I was pushed to wait as the prices should drop like a rock with all the existing Leaf owners trading up to the 2.ZERO.

    As for Tesla: I love their cars, and if I was in a position to buy a Model S I would hit buy immediately. As it stands, it's still my end-goal and will likely be the last car manufacturer I ever buy from.
  • I'm maybe taking a gamble but going for the Zoe as, in my view, Nissan is 'overcharging' for their product. They no longer have the same market dominance they did. I may of course regret this decision............ time will tell. The Home Charge technician has been to see the property and I'm waiting on hearing back from them re an install date. There's no rush as the vehicle isn't due until the end of February.
  • edited December 1
    @linesrg, Robert Llewellyn has had some good things to say about the new Zoe (Fully Charged video here).

    I think it's still a tricky call right now as the big car manufacturers are only really now bringing out models that would appeal to the masses and so far they've really just taken a few years ironing out the bugs.
  • @BenWoodford I'm also going on the hope that Lead owners will be queueing up to buy the 2018 model and that there will suddenly be a huge number of second hand cheap Leafs to buy with an owned battery. To prepare myself I've started trying to drive my dinosaur powered car as if it was a Leaf. Basically, don't drive more than 90 miles, unless I've parked the car at home overnight (as if it was trickle charged).
  • @mowcius, Once I get back home I'll give that link a look as there's no chance of downloading that over a commercial ship's internet link! There was the annual meeting of the residents and factors for our 'blocks' in Aberdeen on the 28th. I did raise the question re EV charging points but am not overly hopeful. We have eight public charging points in Inverurie currently (there is also one at the 'posh' plumbers and another one at the Electric Centre) and Scotrail/ Abellio are threatening to start installing some at rail stations next year.

    Saw an interesting set of figures the other day. US annual automobile demand was 35 million and Elon could maybe produce 100,000........... figures show 22085 Tesla S, 20070 Chevy Bolts and 10953 Leaf's sold this year. There were 345 Tesla 3 sold last month and 712 total for the year. Elon was aiming to be making 10,000 a week sometime next year. There is still time to pull the rabbit out of that hat.
  • @BenWoodford I'm also going on the hope that Lead owners will be queueing up to buy the 2018 model and that there will suddenly be a huge number of second hand cheap Leafs to buy with an owned battery. To prepare myself I've started trying to drive my dinosaur powered car as if it was a Leaf. Basically, don't drive more than 90 miles, unless I've parked the car at home overnight (as if it was trickle charged).

    Sadly, the new Leaf is clocking in at around £350/m for a PCP, which is ridiculously high as the Leaf is nowhere near a £30,000 car - £15k-20k at best. Need to buck their ideas up as the Model 3 is going to stomp all over them.
  • @BenWoodford - true but the Model 3 is not expected on UK roads with right hand drive until 2019, and presumably that's if they can get to the numbers in the US market they want to by then.

    I'm sure they can do it, but by then the new Leaf will have been on sale for a year and will have the leading market position. It might the same price for a less superior product (although I'm sure it will be a fantastic car in it's own right) - but things are moving fast now in the UK with electric car demand (I think I read somewhere that electric car sales went up 600% this year?) so they could miss a significant chunk of this demand to the Leaf.
  • the Model 3 is not expected on UK roads with right hand drive until 2019, and presumably that's if they can get to the numbers in the US market they want to by then.

    With that delay it wouldn't surprise me if Tesla announces another new car by the time we get the Model 3 over here :smirk:

  • The latest Fully Charged episode is out with Jonny Smith reviewing the new Nissan Leaf.

Sign In or Register to comment.