The Decent LED thread (high CRI/R9 LEDs) — Bulb Community

The Decent LED thread (high CRI/R9 LEDs)

edited January 10 in Everything but Bulb
As high CRI LEDs (over 90) seem so hard to come by, I thought I'd start a thread with some manufacturers/suppliers I've found while on the hunt for them.

Yuji LED (https://yujiintl.com/ and https://store.yujiintl.com/) manufacture high CRI LEDs. Very spendy but apparently some of the best.
Civilight (http://civilight.nl/en/products/) manufacture mostly high CRI LEDs with R9 of around 90, 11W bayonet version sold locally by Well Lit, see below.
Well-lit (https://well-lit.co.uk/) sell some very reasonably priced LEDs with CRI figures over 90. 95 CRI GU10s in 7W and 9W.
UltraLEDs sell some >90 CRI LED tape (https://www.ultraleds.co.uk/
Plumen sell some >90 CRI LEDs (https://ukshop.plumen.com/)


Integral and Philips have both announced very high CRI LEDs but so far I've been unable to find any for sale.

Comments

  • edited January 23
    @mowcius - we are a new lighting company and will focus on high CRI and specialized spectral products. We haven't announced our full product lineup yet, but we do have some CRI and CRI R9 guides that we hope you'll find useful.
  • edited January 23
    Hi @waveform, are you manufacturing your own lighting or partnering with another company to produce specific products for your markets?

    I'd definitely be interested to hear what you will have in GU10, E27 and B22.

    Do you know when you will have released any further information and how they will be available in the UK?

    (@Will at Bulb/@Andrew at Bulb, is advertising like this permitted? So long as it's relevant to the discussion?)
  • Hi @mowcius!

    We are an ODM company that partners with factories to manufacture lights to our designs and specifications. Our mission is to address specific needs in niche lighting applications by providing lights that are tailored for that particular use case.

    We'll likely have a high CRI bulb in a standard A19 format and E27 base, in 2700K, 4000K and 6500K. We aim to have it available by April of this year.

    Our launch market will be the USA but UK will follow shortly via Amazon or similar platform.

    As far as CRI is concerned, there are lots of players out there, but it's hard to find one that can maintain high CRI at higher color temperatures.

    I would add SORAA to your list :)

  • waveform said:

    I would add SORAA to your list :)

    Not sure how I missed them.
    They have a lot of products so I can see that digging around to find what I'm after might take a while!
    Our mission is to address specific needs in niche lighting applications by providing lights that are tailored for that particular use case.
    Do you know what kind of price point you're aiming for with any bulbs that could be considered for a residential application?
  • @mowcius , we're still finalizing our price points but we'll let you know with more details as we come closer to launch!
  • Probably on the other end of the scale, but Ikea sell some 90 CRI bulbs for home use.
  • edited August 11
    @Kansai12, your comment caused me to investigate this more, and came across this page.

    It seems that some of them are rather good (even in the red/R9 area), but you have to pick carefully.
  • @mowcius, on the plus side, those findings are of IKEA bulbs that are 3 years old.

    I have to agree that you do have to pick carefully, as I have returned a few bulbs from them that I found to be rather inadequate, but this does mean that sometimes you will find a £4 bulb that does the same job as something costing triple or quadruple that price.

    I currently have Well-Lit, Civilight, and Ikea bulbs in my home.
  • Has anyone tried the Phillips Master Ledspot Expert Color? Supposedly they have 97CRI. Seem to be around £8 per bulb for GU10 http://www.lighting.philips.co.uk/prof/led-lamps-and-tubes/led-spots/master-ledspot-expertcolor-mv
  • It's a shame they're only making MR16 and GU10 versions (http://www.lighting.philips.co.uk/products/product-highlights/expertcolor) as for most residential installations, these are the least useful lamp styles. Obviously marketed towards commercial applications but I'll have to pick some up to try at that price.
  • I'd be interested to see recommendations along these lines that are also dimmable, and that - as well as being available in all six common domestic sockets (this place is unbelievable, I have all of them except small bayonet) - can work gracefully with non-LED-specific dimmers (of which I have three, none of which I fancy having to replace if it's at all possible to avoid).

    My experience with LEDs and CFLs that claim to be dimmable has been extremely variable so far and there doesn't seem to be any easy way to determine or predict what types actually live up to the claims.

    It's bad enough that, having just found out that Halogens (up until now, promoted as mild energy savers thanks to their 30% better output per watt, and much better affordability than CFL/LED, which makes more sense if they only get limited use) are set to go the way of Incandescents from tomorrow onwards, I'm about to pull out my box o' bulbs and, if I haven't enough to last the next ten years, make a quick trip down to Asda and pick up a few extra...
  • In my experience, you're going to really struggle with LEDs that can be dimmed with old style dimmers. They tend to be triac leading edge dimmers with a rather high minimum load requirement so unless you have around 10 LEDs being dimmed from one dimmer, they're not going to want to work, let alone work well.

    I've had positive results with Varilight V-Pro dimmers on most dimmable LEDs, but they are quite expensive.


    Unfortunately as technology gets more efficient and more complex, the intricacies of it tend to increase, increasing the cost and lowering the plug-and-play nature of systems.
  • edited September 11
    Hi @mowcius and everyone else on the thread:

    Exciting news - we've released a new 10W A19 95 CRI bulb compatible with both US & European voltages (90 - 240 V AC, 50-60 Hz).

    Here are our photometric test reports for 2700K and 3000K.

    To @MarkP & @mowcius 's points regarding dimmability - these bulbs are NOT dimmable. We found it very challenging to engineer LED drivers to be legacy-compatible with a whole range of dimmers out there, across various configurations (e.g. total load / voltage range) with consistent dimming performance. Our biggest challenge has been achieving a smooth & consistent dimming curve from 100% to 0%. Rather than release a "dimmable" product with mediocre dimming performance, we've decided to stay with a non-dimmable spec for now. That being said, we're hopeful we can soon reach a point where we can incorporate perfect dimming performance in a high CRI configuration.
  • They do look nice and not a bad price either, although shipping makes smaller quantities a bit expensive over here.
    Any UK distributors likely in the near future?

    Also, any plans to release B22 versions? Unless they've been buying all of their light fixtures from IKEA, most people in the UK will have B22 lamp sockets.
  • @mowcius : We're working on establishing distribution/retail and will update as we progress. Unfortunately there are no immediate plans for developing a B22 base version.
  • waveform said:

    We're working on establishing distribution/retail and will update as we progress

    Keep me updated with UK distributors as I'd love to try some of these out in my house as well as for upcoming jobs.
    Selling high CRI lamps to clients is never very tricky, and in most situations switching to edison screw wouldn't be the end of the world.

  • edited September 26
    waveform said:


    As far as CRI is concerned, there are lots of players out there, but it's hard to find one that can maintain high CRI at higher color temperatures.

    I would add SORAA to your list :)

    I've tried SORAA VIVID 7.5W 4000K 95 CRI (GU10 format).
    The colour was OK, but they flicker very badly at 100Hz. So you would not want to do photography, or shoot video (perhaps with a phone) under these lights.
    Also, the 100Hz flicker is low enough to cause problems for humans, while high enough that they may not realise where the problem is coming from.
  • JEJV said:

    I've tried SORAA VIVID 7.5W 4000K 95 CRI (GU10 format).
    The colour was OK, but they flicker very badly at 100Hz. So you would not want to do photography, or shoot video (perhaps with a phone) under these lights.
    Also, the 100Hz flicker is low enough to cause problems for humans, while high enough that they may not realise where the problem is coming from.

    I notice regularly how bad the flicker is with some LEDs. This evening I noticed while out eating food, how much of a stroboscopic effect I got when moving my cutlery. It was quite disconcerting, although the colour of the LEDs was actually quite nice (generic LED filament bulbs).
  • I have some worse bulbs: KVA-MR16-GU10-45001 (KVA Lighting 4500K 5W dimmable 24 degree beam "HIGH CRI 85+").
    These completely blank out at 100 Hz. So the Flicker Percent (Modulation depth) is 100%. Oops.

    The best GU10 I've found so far ar Philips ExpertColor 4000K 5.5W 25 degree GU10.
    I've tried a few of these, and while I can see small changes in spectrum, they're much more stable than halogen GU10s!

    This is all at 240V AC, 50Hz, no dimming.

    The really weird thing is that I've also tried Philips ExpertColor 4000K & 3000K 5.5W 36 degree GU10.
    These do have easily detectable changes in output power & spectrum (worse for 3000K). I'd have expected the electronic design to be identical, certainly for 4000K 36 degree.

    What I'm using to measure Flicker Percent is an SLR camera, using the focal plane shutter, and a high shutter speed to turn the camera into a kind of digital storage osciloscope, with a ~3ms timebase, and a bandwidth dependent on the shutter speed (typ ~1/2000s). In a dark room, I point the bulb at a piece of paper from a few inches, and point the camera, with a defocussed macro lens with a deep lens hood at the same piece of paper. I then shoot a burst of 20-30 shots, and examine the RAW images in RawDigger, which computes histograms and averages from the RAW camera images.

    I'll post again when I have some more data, and looked at the data more. I was surprised how much flicker I was seeing from a halogen GU10.
  • JEJV said:

    The best GU10 I've found so far ar Philips ExpertColor 4000K 5.5W 25 degree GU10.
    I've tried a few of these, and while I can see small changes in spectrum, they're much more stable than halogen GU10s!

    This is all at 240V AC, 50Hz, no dimming.

    The really weird thing is that I've also tried Philips ExpertColor 4000K & 3000K 5.5W 36 degree GU10.
    These do have easily detectable changes in output power & spectrum (worse for 3000K). I'd have expected the electronic design to be identical, certainly for 4000K 36 degree.

    It's good to hear that those are at least half decent flicker wise as that makes them an even more attractive proposition, especially at that price point.

    Really weird that the different angles have different internals though. Did you buy them at the same time? Perhaps the 25deg are a slightly newer improved design?

    It would be interesting to see a teardown of the two. You haven't by any chance got a sample of both that could be sent to Big Clive? He often reviews the circuitry of quite a lot of cheaper LEDs (but doesn't look into the spectrum output).

  • edited September 27
    I did some checks on the consistency of my SLR shutter this morning - I'm fairly pleased with my D7200 - it seems consistent to about +/- 2% (extreme range), +/-1% (SD) up to 1/8000 s. That was with bright sunlight under a clear sky. I'll double check the other bulbs later. Have other things to do now.
  • edited October 1

    Flicker Testing

    Executive summary:
    • All the Philips ExpertColor 5.5W bulbs I tested have significantly less flicker than Halogen.
    • All the LED bulbs have more stable colour than Halogen. The colour of a halogen bulb depends on the filament temperature, which varies through the AC mains cycle, at 2x mains frequency.
    • Some LED bulbs (KVA tested) shut down completely at 100 Hz.
    There's some evidence that Philips 4000K bulbs behave better than 3000K bulbs, and that the Philips 25 degree bulbs behave better than the 36 degree bulbs.

    The most robust figures below are the Interquartile ranges and the Standard Deviation estimates. The Range figures are not robust: I worked out that I'd made an artithmetic error when working out how many samples I needed to give statistical certainty of covering a 100Hz cycle with sample windows: briefly I should have used a larger patch for sampling, and recorded about 80 samples for each run.

    The percentage columns are the ones to look at. SD is expressed as a percentage of mean, interquartile range and range are expressed as a percentage of median.

    In the mean rows, the percentages refer to RGB means relative to green mean. So they give a crude way to compare the blueness/yellowness of the bulbs.

    Method:
    • Bulb is mounted in an undimmed desk light. Mains is 240V, 50Hz.
    • Bulb given about 5 minutes to stablise before recording anything.
    • Bulb is pointed nearly vertically at a sheet of laser printer paper, backed by an opaque white card from about 10cm.
    • D7200 Camera is pointed at centre of illumination, at an angle of about 45 degrees with the lens hood about 10cm from the centre of illumination. Camera White Balance is fixed (on Nikon, WB slightly affects RAW data). Camera is on a tripod.
    • Lens is 60mm macro (90mm Full-frame equivalent), at f/4, focussed at/near infinity.
    • Exposure is 1/2000s. ISO 100.
    Processing data:
    • The D7200 uses a focal-plane shutter with a travel time of approximately 2.4ms (I initially thought it was more like 3ms, which is part of the reason for insufficient samples).
    • I sample a 700x700 patch of RAW Bayer data from the centre of the frame, and export the RGB RAW means for this patch to a .CSV, using RawDigger. The sensor is 6016x4016 pixels.
    • The temporal smoothing effect of the shutter combined with averaging over the 700 pixel high sampling window is equivalent to passing the light through a 0.5ms moving-average ("box") filter [shutter window], followed by a 0.42ms moving-average ("box") filter [image sample patch]. The combined effect is a trapezoidal filter with a -3dB bandwidth of roughly 700Hz (response down by ~30% at 700Hz). Response is 50% at about 950Hz. Any flicker above about 1.5kHz is unlikely to be detected.
    • The .CSVs are imported to a spreadsheet, and the statistics below are based on the sample RAW RGB means.
    Comments on statistics below:
    • The "2000_sunlight" data is a test of the consistency of the shutter speed of the camera. It gives a noise floor for the other tests. Anything which gives flicker measures as low as the sunlight test is basically too low for me to measure. My neighbour commented that maybe I should consider the noise spectrum of sunlight B) .
    • The Halogen bulb is the only bulb which shows significantly different flicker in the R,G,B channels. This is to be expected - the temperature of the Halogen bulb varies a lot over a cycle.
    • The KVA bulb shuts down completely at 100Hz. Many of the KVA bulb images have dark bands across them. But this isn't accurately reflected in the statistics below because of the insufficient number of samples mentioned above. The dark band in the image can "miss" the sample patch.
    • Don't try to read too much into the absolute numbers. They can vary a bit with small changes in setup.
    			Red		Green		Blue
    2000_sunlight
    SD estimate 22.8 0.6% 56.7 0.6% 43.2 0.6%
    Interquartile range 20.5 0.6% 51.0 0.6% 39.6 0.6%
    Range 87.3 2.4% 217.4 2.4% 166.0 2.4%
    N Samples 18 18 18
    Mean 3663 40% 9218 100% 6889 75%

    Philips_4k_24D_5W5_4
    SD estimate 16.6 0.6% 31.7 0.6% 18.4 0.5%
    Interquartile range 24.2 0.8% 46.1 0.8% 26.6 0.8%
    Range 75.7 2.5% 143.4 2.5% 83.8 2.5%
    N Samples 38 38 38
    Mean 3011 52% 5750 100% 3372 59%

    Philips_3k_24D_5W5_2
    SD estimate 44.3 1.0% 66.0 1.0% 28.4 1.0%
    Interquartile range 34.5 0.8% 52.3 0.8% 22.6 0.8%
    Range 246.0 5.8% 368.0 5.8% 158.0 5.8%
    N Samples 39 39 39
    Mean 4248 67% 6322 100% 2729 43%

    Philips_4k_36D_5W5_2
    SD estimate 38.3 2.2% 71.0 2.3% 39.6 2.2%
    Interquartile range 35.9 2.1% 66.4 2.1% 37.4 2.1%
    Range 146.3 8.5% 271.2 8.6% 151.2 8.4%
    N Samples 39 39 39
    Mean 1715 54% 3147 100% 1783 57%

    Philips_3k_36D_5W5_2
    SD estimate 211.5 6.5% 309.5 6.5% 129.8 6.3%
    Interquartile range 254.4 7.5% 372.4 7.5% 155.7 7.3%
    Range 697.9 20.5% 1021.5 20.6% 429.4 20.2%
    N Samples 39 39 39
    Mean 3279 69% 4781 100% 2050 43%

    Lloytron_Halogen_35W_38D_2
    SD estimate 554.8 13.8% 836.3 15.7% 354.7 18.0%
    Interquartile range 1124.5 28.3% 1693.9 32.2% 717.8 37.0%
    Range 1630.4 41.0% 2451.0 46.6% 1036.7 53.5%
    N Samples 39 39 39
    Mean 4019 75% 5328 100% 1971 37%

    SORAA_4K_25D_7W5_2
    SD estimate 565.2 23.8% 1148.1 24.0% 706.6 24.3%
    Interquartile range 1111.0 46.5% 2257.2 47.0% 1388.6 47.5%
    Range 1566.8 65.6% 3183.1 66.2% 1959.1 67.0%
    N Samples 39 39 39
    Mean 2374 50% 4780 100% 2913 61%

    KVA_4K5_24D_5W
    SD estimate 879.1 22.2% 1784.5 22.1% 997.6 21.7%
    Interquartile range 1056.9 24.4% 2132.3 24.1% 1185.0 23.6%
    Range 3346.5 77.2% 6808.4 76.9% 3817.8 76.0%
    N Samples 39 39 39
    Mean 3956 49% 8086 100% 4598 57%
  • edited October 1
    I found a test of the Philips ExpertColor 3000K 5.5W 36 Degree. Quite scary, if you make LED lighting.
    R9=94 R12=82 everything else 96-99. R1-R8=97.6. CQS 94.8.

    http://lamptest.ru/review/01781-philips-8718696755907-master-expertcolor/
    (The Russian word "grad" means both hail, as in precipitation, and degree, as in angle).

    The current/voltage graph suggests it has a big enough capacitor near the input to stabilise the LED power over the whole mains cycle.

    SORAA VIVID and Philips ExpertColor seem to have similar colour performance, but, for me, SORAA needs to fix their drive circuitry and cut their prices by 60%.

    I'd like to see Philips publish CRI, CQS, and TM30 data, and I'd like to see CQS, and TM30 data from SORAA.
  • @JEJV, absolutely fantastic data, thanks for sharing!

    I'd love for all manufacturers to be forced to publsh TM30 (or TQS) as a simple percentage, as well as luminous flux, to allow customers to compare lamps properly.

    Right now I'd mostly love Philips to release some ExpertColor lamps in other fittings though, ideally B22 and E27 to start.
  • edited October 19
    I can't find any actual tests but I noticed the other day that Plumen now do an LED version of their 001 which apparently has a CRI of >90
    Improved quality of light (90CRI, with better reds)
    I'd like to see a proper test - sadly lamptest.ru has nothing.

    Despite being considerably more expensive than the original version, the swirly bits are now made of polycarbonate rather than glass so I also wonder whether it still holds up to its designer aesthetic when you get up close.
  • edited November 24
    waveform said:

    @mowcius : We're working on establishing distribution/retail and will update as we progress. Unfortunately there are no immediate plans for developing a B22 base version.

    @waveform : Do you at least plan to make a E27 version? I find it a little strange that you have a page explicitly warning against using E26 bulbs in E27 fixtures https://www.waveformlighting.com/home-residential/e26-vs-e27-bulbs-are-they-interchangeable for reasons unrelated to voltage compatibility but you only seem to be selling E26 bulbs yet also seem to be targeting the 220-240V markets :open_mouth: Unless your bulbs are actually E27 but sold as E26 since your primary target is the US market, or you ship different bulbs depending on destination country, if so you should say. Or maybe this is awaiting local distribution/retail in 220-240V markets?

    Anyway it's quite nice to see your 6500K. And I see you also have a ballast compatible T5 bulb. These are two things I've missed. Most high CRI LED light bulbs seem to top out at 4000K. Some like Yuji make it to 5000K but even that's rare and IIRC they've been out of stock for a while. I'd like at least 5500K. And ballast compatible high CRI, high CCT, forget it! Do you have a photometrics for the A19 6500K bulb? This page has several for 6500K including the T5 but none for the A19 bulb.

    Any plans for high CCT high CRI 12V GU5.3 MR16 or 220-240V GU10 bulbs? Again these seem to be markets poorly served. E.g. the Phillips ExpertColor mentioned earlier tops out at 4000K. Also, any plans for adding to your T5 and A19 range with something between 6500K and 4000K (probably 5000K)? While this is a little better served than 6500K it's still from what I've seen more limited.

    Also I take it from the same model number 4003.65 that there's no difference between the "NorthLux™ 95 CRI 6500K E26 A19 LED Bulb for Art & Studio" and "Full Spectrum E26 A19 LED Bulb" (6500K variant) and "Ultra High 95 CRI 6500K E26 A19 LED Bulb for Jewelry & Display" and "Ultra High 95 CRI 6500K E26 A19 LED Bulb for Jewelry & Display" and "Avian Full Spectrum E26 A19 LED Bulb for Birds"? (But weirdly the avian one is sold out.) Likewise for the 4021.65 "NorthLux™ 95 CRI 6500K T5 LED Tube for Art & Studio" and "Ultra High 95 CRI T5 LED Tube for Home & Residential" (6500K variant) and "Full Spectrum T5 LED Tube" (6500K variant) and "Ultra High 95 CRI 6500K T5 LED Tube for Jewelry & Display"?
  • @nil_einne, what are your applications for 6500K?
  • edited November 24
    @mowcius Home lighting, I prefer 5500-6500K for most purposes.
  • Does anyone have experience with Fotga 15W 5600K CRI>95 which seems like a good buy from Amazon.co.uk, assuming the specs are true?
  • edited November 24
    nil_einne said:

    @mowcius Home lighting, I prefer 5500-6500K for most purposes.

    5500K I can just about understand but 6500K? Do you have warmer temperatures in lamps/bedrooms?
    jacobsj said:

    Does anyone have experience with Fotga 15W 5600K CRI>95 which seems like a good buy from Amazon.co.uk, assuming the specs are true?

    As there seem to be no datasheets available I'd be very wary of the >95 CRI claim. A >95CRI lamp can have a pretty horrible colour profile as CRI only takes pastel colours into consideration.
  • mowcius said:

    nil_einne said:

    @mowcius Home lighting, I prefer 5500-6500K for most purposes.

    5500K I can just about understand but 6500K? Do you have warmer temperatures in lamps/bedrooms?
    Quite.
    mowcius said:

    jacobsj said:

    Does anyone have experience with Fotga 15W 5600K CRI>95 which seems like a good buy from Amazon.co.uk, assuming the specs are true?

    As there seem to be no datasheets available I'd be very wary of the >95 CRI claim. A >95CRI lamp can have a pretty horrible colour profile as CRI only takes pastel colours into consideration.
    Indeed. A datasheet or review quoting all 14/15 CRI values - in particular, R9 [saturated red] would be a good start.

    CRI Ra has a lot of problems as a measure of light quality. There are better measures, such as CQS. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Color_rendering_index#Criticism . Unfortunately it remains widely quoted.
    Discussion of CRI Ra & CQS:

    It is also important to consider flicker. LED lamps, particularly dimmable LED lamps, can have quite bad flicker. This can be a non-obvious ergonomic problem for people working or living under such lights, and can have severe effects on photography or video shot under such lights. A "percent flicker" of less than 25%, measured with a 500Hz bandwidth, seems like a good starting point. That roughly corresponds to the flicker of a halogen light on 50Hz mains.
  • Thanks mowcius and JEJV!

    I’m finding it very difficult to find a good E27 LED bulb with high power (20-25W), daylight temperature and very good colour accuracy, for miniature painting, seeing as I can’t really go by the CRI.

    Maybe someone has a suggestion for something available in the EU? I already checked out the links at the top of course. I would just order some waveform ones if I not for the import fees.
  • jacobsj said:

    I’m finding it very difficult to find a good E27 LED bulb with high power (20-25W), daylight temperature and very good colour accuracy, for miniature painting, seeing as I can’t really go by the CRI.

    Maybe someone has a suggestion for something available in the EU? I already checked out the links at the top of course. I would just order some waveform ones if I not for the import fees.

    Miniature painting?

    Can't you do your painting, and then use the sliders in Lightroom to set the white balance, or boost the reds ? Works for me.

    Seriously, wow!

    On a low budget, maybe get a GU10 desk lamp, and a 4000K Philips ExpertColor bulb to start with ? GU10 format seems to offer a variety of bulbs that aren't wildly expensive. It seems to be a format targeted by folk who try to make good lights. Like mowcius.

    When you say miniature, I understand that as meaning paintings on a scale of ~3-10cm.

    Do you work from memory, or do you work from a physical object, a printed image, or an image on a monitor ?

    LED video/photographic lights might be worth looking at. They're getting quite affordable. dpreview.com has a lighting forum.
  • I can see I should have been more precise. Doing miniature paintings sound like fun too, and might actually make a good Youtube channel :D

    But what I meant was painting ca. 3 cm tall metal figures for use in strategic tabletop wargames. Often painted without natural light, but often viewed in natural light, the light needs to basically be as close to sunshine as I can reasonably get. And also fairly powerful to really be able to see that details.

    Thank you, I will check out your suggestions. I was also thinking photographic lights, and the Fotga I asked about are actually marketed as such, but who knows how those actually perform without a datasheet, so I’m not getting them.
  • There's an interesting worklight construction project in this video using high CRI LED tape that might be of interest to you:
  • @Grum, although >90CRI might be quite good for LED strip, compared to the other LED lamps that have been discussed here, it's actually pretty horrible.

    You can buy some properly high CRI tape now (https://www.ultraleds.co.uk/catalogsearch/result/index/?cri=190&q=LED) but it's expensive. £20 a metre puts it well into the commercial/premium install only price range.
    They do make it from 2000K to 6000K (although datasheet says 5500K) which is pretty cool though.

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