What’s the deal? — Bulb Community

What’s the deal?

So, I recently open an account with bulb, put in my usage, get hooked in with a price per month estimate and less than 2 weeks later get an email to tell me the levy per energy supply is going up and also that I’m not paying enough to cover it ... all of a sudden!
Even though you sucked me in with promises of the lowest cost.
How does that work?
How are you better than the ‘big suppliers’?
I’m annoyed at your sneaky sales tactics to be honest and unless you can give me a good reason to stay I’m off.

Comments

  • It is not sneaky tactics as they did announce possible price rises several weeks back and gave existing customers 60 days notice, I think you will find all suppliers will be raising their prices, in fact I did a price comparison yesterday and was advised I could save £100 per year but what that `sneaky` website did was use the figures for my price rise that is due in Nov and not my current price.
  • scudo said:

    It is not sneaky tactics as they did announce possible price rises several weeks back and gave existing customers 60 days notice, I think you will find all suppliers will be raising their prices, in fact I did a price comparison yesterday and was advised I could save £100 per year but what that `sneaky` website did was use the figures for my price rise that is due in Nov and not my current price.

    Isn't that better then... why compare with current prices when they are going up...
  • Not for me, as they could give a false impression that Bulb are more expensive, because Bulb give 60 days notice and others don't you could switch only to find the new supplier will also increase prices. It is to some extent a game of poker he who puts prices up last may gain more customers but not necessarily over a period the cheapest energy which, to date is how I have found it with Bulb being cheaper over a given period.
  • scudo said:

    Not for me, as they could give a false impression that Bulb are more expensive, because Bulb give 60 days notice and others don't you could switch only to find the new supplier will also increase prices. It is to some extent a game of poker he who puts prices up last may gain more customers but not necessarily over a period the cheapest energy which, to date is how I have found it with Bulb being cheaper over a given period.

    I see, well I am switching to a fixed deal.

    £25 cheaper, and don't have to deal with Bulb scalping me every 3-4 months
  • Hi Guys, a variable price isn't for everyone and @darren8792 if you'd rather move over to a fixed tariff with someone else that's fair enough. We do our best to keep prices as low as we can, and we give as much notice as possible before our prices rises, as @scudo mentioned. We'll also be dropping our prices as soon as we can, when wholesale energy prices start going back down again-keep an eye out!
  • Hi

    Although not totally related to the topic, I am interested on whether the increase in alternative energy sources ie wind, solar, hydro etc will mean a reduction in prices in the energy sector in the long run and whether energy providers are investing much in these areas.

    I for one wouldn't mind paying small short term increases to allow for such investments safe in the knowledge that there would be long term gain both financially and green wise.
  • @Shaun_C_01 in theory, yes - if there's an increase in alternative energy sources (and the electricity becomes cheaper to produce), this should drive down the wholesale prices of electricity, and they should be less affected by factors like the price of natural gas, as a smaller proportion of the electricity would be generated in conventional power plants.
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