Green cities: What should we be doing? — Bulb Community

Green cities: What should we be doing?

Here are 5 cities that have made steps to increase environmental sustainability.

What do you think we should be doing in the UK to be greener? Or maybe we’re already doing it?

Valencia: Spain
After large floods, the Valencian government diverted the Turin river that runs through the city. They turned the river bed into a file mile garden - Jardín del Turia.

With bike paths, walking paths, event spaces, sports fields, fountains and play areas, they’ve transformed it into a network for healthy and green living.

Bristol: UK
Bristol was voted Europe’s greenest city in 2015. Bristol has 3 and a half times more cyclists than the average UK city. They’ve increased their recycling rates to 50%. And they have a ‘green economy’; over 1000 businesses in Bristol provide environmental services. Great work Bristol.

Los Angeles: US
Los Angeles has some of the most congested roads in the world. Scientists are testing ways to harness this and generate electricity.

Piezoelectric crystals will be put under tarmac of major highways. When a vehicle drives over them it will generate an electrical charge. It’s estimated that just a 10 mile stretch of road could create enough power for 100,000 homes.

Curitiba: Brazil
The local government planted a whopping one and a half million trees as part of their sustainable urban planning. They offered property owners reduced taxes if they plant native trees that grow much taller and live much longer than exotic ones.

Copenhagen: Denmark
Over 50% of Copenhageners use a bicycle to get to work or school. There are so many cyclists, communters find themselves sitting in bike traffic.

Comments

  • Piezoelectric crystals will be put under tarmac of major highways. When a vehicle drives over them it will generate an electrical charge. It’s estimated that just a 10 mile stretch of road could create enough power for 100,000 homes.

    This sounds about as bad as solar freakin' roadways (Thunderf00t/EEVblog).

    Interesting things I've heard recently:
    Denmark to start labelling food according to environmental impact:
    https://www.thelocal.dk/20181008/denmark-to-mark-food-according-to-effect-on-climate
    Anyone remember when we had CO2 labels on some crisps? news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/7002450.stm


    Unsurprisingly, EBRD now says renewables are cheapest: https://ebrd.com/news/2018/ebrd-says-renewables-are-now-cheapest-energy-source-.html
  • I got some funny looks in the office watching Solar Freakin Roadways @mowcius.

    There are dancefloors that use kinetic energy to make for a fully sustainable boogie. I will see if Hayden will approve them in Bulb's office ;)

    Food is always has a surprising environmental impact. That's a good move by the Danish government. Have a climate-friendly choice is really important. It would be interesting to know what the economic impact on a 'climate-friendly' diet would be.
  • There are dancefloors that use kinetic energy to make for a fully sustainable boogie. I will see if Hayden will approve them in Bulb's office ;)

    I'd be extremely surprised if they create enough energy to simply power the LEDs within them, let alone create useable power for other uses on the side. I suspect that a dance floor that moved enough to create a useful quantity of energy from the people on it would be like trying to dance on foam.

    On a related note, I hear that you're starting to run out of space in the office for energy specialists, let alone a light-up dance floor!
    It would fit in well with the multicoloured boob ceiling though :wink:
  • The multicoloured ceiling is not our finest design feature but is certainly unique.

    The team is growing quickly but the walls don't seem to be expanding at the same rate. It's getting cosier but I think we still have a few seats left.

    Perhaps you'd need more of a mosh pit than a dancefloor to create enough kinetic energy.


  • edited October 19

    The multicoloured ceiling is not our finest design feature but is certainly unique.

    Personally I love it. It's funky and as you say, definitely unique. Acoustically it seemed fantastic which is a vast improvement over most offices.
    Do you get many comments about it?
    The team is growing quickly but the walls don't seem to be expanding at the same rate. It's getting cosier but I think we still have a few seats left.

    Perhaps you'd need more of a mosh pit than a dancefloor to create enough kinetic energy.
    Maybe that's the plan for when you run out of chairs.
  • I think most people like the ceiling @mowcius. There's a debate about what they are though. They're most commonly known as the udders...
  • I think most people like the ceiling @mowcius. There's a debate about what they are though. They're most commonly known as the udders...

    I guess that's a little more corporate friendly!
Sign In or Register to comment.