What is the running cost per hour for a 100 watt appliance? — Bulb Community

What is the running cost per hour for a 100 watt appliance?

edited November 13 in Everything but Bulb
Hi what is the running cost per hour for a 100 watt appliance

Comments

  • jenseph said:

    Hi what is the running cost per hour for a 100 watt appliance

    Gas or electric appliance?
  • edited November 9
    jenseph said:

    Hi what is the running cost per hour for a 100 watt appliance

    Assuming electric, since there's unlikely to be any gas appliances rated at 100 Watts ...

    0.1 kW for 1 hour = 0.1*1 = 0.1 kWh
    0.2 kW for 1 hour = 0.2*1 = 0.2 kWh
    0.1 kW for 2 hour = 0.1 * 2 = 0.2 kWh
    0.2 kW for 0.5 hour= 0.2 * 0.5 = 0.1kWh

    At, say, 13p per kWh, the cost is 0.1 * 13 = 1.3p
  • Allanr said:

    jenseph said:

    Hi what is the running cost per hour for a 100 watt appliance

    Gas or electric appliance?
    electric towel rail
  • For 100w device it will be one tenth of the cost of one kilowatt.
  • marview said:

    For 100w device it will be one tenth of the cost of one kilowatt.

    How much does 1 kW cost? Given that it's a unit of power and not a unit of energy.
  • Just a for the sake of an explanation.

    The supply of energy is charged on the basis for every 1 kilowatt of power (1000 watts) or 1 unit.

    Luckily electricity is supplied in measured in watts, and thus if an appliance uses 100 watts an hour, then calculations as the above describe as (100 watts/1000 watts) * unit rate = cost per hour

    for gas it is measured in cubic feet (cft)or cubic meters (cm), and there is a little conversation need to get 1 kilowatt or 1 unit. and the conversation rate from cft or cm is dependent on many factors, however, typically for every:

    1 cft = 31.6586 Watts
    1 cm = 11.1868 watts
  • The supply of energy is charged on the basis for every 1 kilowatt of power (1000 watts) or 1 unit.

    Luckily electricity is supplied in measured in watts, and thus if an appliance uses 100 watts an hour, then calculations as the above describe as (100 watts/1000 watts) * unit rate = cost per hour

    At the risk of being pedantic, you're confusing energy and power.

    Power = Kilowatt (kW)
    Energy = Kilowatt-hour (kWh)

    There is no such thing as energy "for every 1 kilowatt of power" and it makes no sense to say "if an appliance uses 100 watts an hour".

    The correct answer is what I posted above and everything else so far has been wrong.

    Your calculation is correctly written with units:

    (100 Watts * 1 hour) = 100 Wh

    100Wh / 1000 = 0.1 kWh

    0.1 kWh * (pence/kWh) = pence
  • Hooloovoo said:

    The supply of energy is charged on the basis for every 1 kilowatt of power (1000 watts) or 1 unit.

    Luckily electricity is supplied in measured in watts, and thus if an appliance uses 100 watts an hour, then calculations as the above describe as (100 watts/1000 watts) * unit rate = cost per hour

    At the risk of being pedantic, you're confusing energy and power.

    Power = Kilowatt (kW)
    Energy = Kilowatt-hour (kWh)

    There is no such thing as energy "for every 1 kilowatt of power" and it makes no sense to say "if an appliance uses 100 watts an hour".

    The correct answer is what I posted above and everything else so far has been wrong.

    Your calculation is correctly written with units:

    (100 Watts * 1 hour) = 100 Wh

    100Wh / 1000 = 0.1 kWh

    0.1 kWh * (pence/kWh) = pence
    I never said anything like that, I said that energy is charged per kilowatt per hour not that KW is a form of measurement . And i clearly provide the same explanation as you, so i think your just wasting everyone time.
  • edited November 21

    I never said anything like that, I said that energy is charged per kilowatt per hour not that KW is a form of measurement.

    You said "electricity is supplied in [sic] measured in watts". That's wrong.

    You've now said " energy is charged kilowatt per hour". That's also wrong.

    It's not kilowatt per hour (kW/hour). It's kilowatt-hour (kW*hour). They are very different things! It's essential to understand the correct units in order to correctly calculate cost.

    Likewise "1 cft = 31.6586 Watts, 1 cm = 11.1868 watts". This is kWh. Not just watts. Wrong units and wrong order of magnitude. Plus you failed to mention that 1 imperial gas unit it typically 100s of cubic feet, not 1 cubic foot.

    And i clearly provide the same explanation as you, so i think your just wasting everyone time.

    Only by luck rather than intention! If the OP had asked how must it cost to run for 2 hours, then your calculation wouldn't work because at no point do you include time in your equation. So your answer is "just wasting everyone [sic] time".
  • stop it !! I asked a question about a 100w towel rail and have got my answer, so please stop arguing
  • jenseph said:

    ...so please stop arguing

    No, please don't.
    This is, after all, an energy company's forum, so what better place to banish misinformation and establish the facts, so long as discussions are conducted in a polite manner with no personal insults.
  • 198kHz said:

    jenseph said:

    ...so please stop arguing

    No, please don't.
    This is, after all, an energy company's forum, so what better place to banish misinformation and establish the facts, so long as discussions are conducted in a polite manner with no personal insults.
    :+1:
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