Carbon Monoxide alarm procedure — Bulb Community

Carbon Monoxide alarm procedure

Have bulb got a number i can ring if i my carbon Monoxide alarm goes off under my boiler ?

Comments

  • HI @Barbara_Crosby01 ,

    From https://help.bulb.co.uk/hc/en-us/articles/115001233192-What-if-I-have-a-gas-leak- :

    If you think you have a gas leak, the first thing you should do is make yourself safe. Turn off your gas, at the meter if possible, and then call the National Gas Service Emergency Line on 0800 111 999.

    To stay safe:

    Don't smoke
    Don't light matches or cigarette lighters
    Don't turn light switches or anything electrical on or off, including using mobile phones
    Put out any naked flames such as candles
    Open all the doors and windows
    It may just be a case of once you've turned off the gas, the alarm clears. If so, it is your boiler or pipe work at fault*. You'll need to get a 'Gas Safe' engineer in to fix your boiler - Bulb does not offer any coverage/repairs for appliances. If the alarm doesn't clear, you've got a fault someone in the feed to your meter and the National Gas Service Emergency Line will be able to advise appropriately.

    * = Technically, if there is any gas leak, you are meant to call the helpline. They'll then send an engineer out to 'make safe' - i.e. cap your meter (practically disconnecting it) and stick a warning on it. Whilst this is the safer option, if it is just you at home (so no one else can turn your gas meter on without your knowledge), you can probably skip this step and save the cost of your local Gas Safe engineer decapping the meter. Remember, neither myself (just another Bulb customer) or Bulb themselves can offer safety advice apart from 'Get out, stay out and call the emergency line'.
  • edited January 2
    To be absolutely clear, carbon monoxide is produced due to incomplete combustion rather than the gas itself.

    Natural gas has a *very* strong smell and will not set off the alarm, Carbon Monoxide is completely odourless and far more deadly because of it.

    If your Carbon Monoxide alarm does off, open some windows to clear the gas and turn off the boiler. Then you want to ring a local boiler installation/maintenance company rather than Bulb, DNO, or gas emergency line.
    They will be able to firstly test for Carbon Monoxide to confirm the issue, then investigate and resolve the cause.
  • mowcius is right. Turn off boiler, (and anything else that may emit carbon monoxide). Open windows. Do not rest until you are certain the fault has been located and resolved. I have only had this once - the carbon monoxide detector was faulty!
  • Hi @mowcius ,

    You are completely right - however, some carbon monoxide detectors will go off if natural gas leaks (that's how our house builder demoed it to us when we moved in: turned the gas hob on, waited around a minute with the smell of gas filling the room until the detector - other side of the kitchen - went off).
  • edited January 2
    @RichyB, interesting. As far as I was aware, no CO alarms are designed to detect natural gas as well.

    The smell tends to giveaway for a natural gas leak!
    jjimjam said:

    I have only had this once - the carbon monoxide detector was faulty!

    How old was the alarm? I seem to remember that you used to be able to buy CO alarms with user replaceable batteries. I've never understood why any smoke/CO alarms are sold with user-replaceable batteries as the sensors themselves are only guaranteed for 7-10 years which is normally less than the lifespan of the battery.

    My CO alarm states its battery lasts about 7 years - after that you buy a new one.
  • mowcius said:

    The smell tends to giveaway for a natural gas leak!

    That's ok if you haven't lost your sense of smell. Having an alarm with audio/visual alert would be useful.
    mowcius said:

    How old was the alarm? I seem to remember that you used to be able to buy CO alarms with user replaceable batteries. I've never understood why any smoke/CO alarms are sold with user-replaceable batteries as the sensors themselves are only guaranteed for 7-10 years which is normally less than the lifespan of the battery.

    I thought this only applied to the old-style detectors which made use of a radioactive source. I only found out recently when I came to replace the batteries in my non-radioactive detectors that the detector itself had expired. As you say, I just replaced the whole thing.
  • mowcius said:


    How old was the alarm? I seem to remember that you used to be able to buy CO alarms with user replaceable batteries. I've never understood why any smoke/CO alarms are sold with user-replaceable batteries as the sensors themselves are only guaranteed for 7-10 years which is normally less than the lifespan of the battery.

    Not sure how old it was. A few years, perhaps 7. The good news was that it was loud enough to wake me (and my adrenal glands). It was very late, very cold, and awkward with the family.
  • Hooloovoo said:

    I thought this only applied to the old-style detectors which made use of a radioactive source. I only found out recently when I came to replace the batteries in my non-radioactive detectors that the detector itself had expired. As you say, I just replaced the whole thing.

    I wonder whether there's a bit of a case of "this is how it used to be, so we'll stick with it" with new alarms, but dirt and dust will settle in all detectors over time and as much as they auto-calibrate themselves to the new background level they will still have a finite lifespan.

    My thought is it's just not worth skimping on something that could easily save your life. Unless you have a house full of Nest Protect devices, it's not a whole lot of money to get a new set of alarms every 10 years.
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