Home ventilation system running overheads — Bulb Community

Home ventilation system running overheads

The other day, I spotted an ad for a product by enviro vent. It supposedly uses a small fan motor to move fresh air around the house preventing mould and moisture problems.

My house being a 1900s miners terrace and double glazed means it regularly has damp and condensation issues (that and me running the heating at 18C).

I enquired about a brochure and found the cost to me for the system would be around £1400, since its an electric appliance I was wondering about how much electricity and therefore cost it'll use, whether the costs are good for my health and not too bad for my wallet.

Has any bulb member installed such a system? The system I was after wasn't air conditioning so its not actively cooling the air, just moving it about.

Comments

  • I dont know of the system but wouldn't a dehumidifier sort the moisture problem.
  • @scudo I have thought about it, but I think that addresses a symptom rather than a cause. When I had the survey done it's a common thing in older houses that have had upvc installed that they can't 'breathe' anymore and causes the air inside to go stagnant. Modern houses were designed with insulation in mind so they are suitably ventilated.
  • edited February 7

    since its an electric appliance I was wondering about how much electricity and therefore cost it'll use

    Any idea how many watts it uses and how long it'll need to be on for?

    If it's a 1 kW (1,000 watt) device being on for an hour, that'll be (as you expect) 1 kWh - so a month (1 kwh * 24 hours *7 day *4 weeks) would be about 672 kWh - so £89.21 per month in the East Midlands at 13.262p per kWh.

    If it's a much more sensible 500 w (a reasonable medium to high desktop PC power supply running at 100%,) that'll be 0.5 kWh per month - 336 kWh - £44.56 per month.

    If it's a 100 w maximum which runs at 50% for 6 hours a day, then it's a bit more complex:
    50% power - 100 / 50 = so 50 watts for 6 hours = 50 *6 hours = 300 watts a day * 7 * 4 = 8400 watts = 8.4 kWh = £1.11 per month

    If you can let us know the specifications of the system and your region, we can do the approximate maths for you if you want ;)

    [don't know the watts, but do now the amps? then watts = volts * amps and volts in the UK is 230v. Remember power supplies will be 'marked' at the maximum they can 'pull' so a 500w PC power supply can pull a maximum of 500w : but it'll only do that if it's full of hard drives, graphics cards and is being used for intensive tasks: otherwise it'll just use what it needs]
  • RichyB said:

    since its an electric appliance I was wondering about how much electricity and therefore cost it'll use

    Any idea how many watts it uses and how long it'll need to be on for?

    If it's a 1 kW (1,000 watt) device being on for an hour, that'll be (as you expect) 1 kWh - so a month (1 kwh * 24 hours *7 day *4 weeks) would be about 672 kWh - so £89.21 per month in the East Midlands at 13.262p per kWh.

    If it's a much more sensible 500 w (a reasonable medium to high desktop PC power supply running at 100%,) that'll be 0.5 kWh per month - 336 kWh - £44.56 per month.

    If it's a 100 w maximum which runs at 50% for 6 hours a day, then it's a bit more complex:
    50% power - 100 / 50 = so 50 watts for 6 hours = 50 *6 hours = 300 watts a day * 7 * 4 = 8400 watts = 8.4 kWh = £1.11 per month

    If you can let us know the specifications of the system and your region, we can do the approximate maths for you if you want ;)

    [don't know the watts, but do now the amps? then watts = volts * amps and volts in the UK is 230v. Remember power supplies will be 'marked' at the maximum they can 'pull' so a 500w PC power supply can pull a maximum of 500w : but it'll only do that if it's full of hard drives, graphics cards and is being used for intensive tasks: otherwise it'll just use what it needs]
    I looked at the brochure again, in tiny letters a kitchen, and a bathroom unit combined will cost £6-7 a year to run based on electric at 15p a unit. Which is the ballpark I'm in.

    The product is called the enviro vent cyclone 7 for interest.
  • The product is called the enviro vent cyclone 7 for interest.

    This appears to be no more than an extractor fan?

    If you want something to ventilate the house, don't you ideally need something that does ventilation with heat recovery?

    If you do go down the dehumidifier route, for the love of God do not by an Ebac. They're supposed to be the best but mine is terrible. I used to use a desiccant-based dehumidifier which worked great until the heater failed. I bought a compressor-based Ebac to replace it and it's nowhere near as good. Like you I keep the house at around 18/19C and it's just not warm enough for a dehumidifier that relies on condensation onto cooling plates to work efficiently. I'd buy another desiccant-based device but I just can't face spending even more money after getting the Ebac.
  • Hooloovoo said:

    The product is called the enviro vent cyclone 7 for interest.

    This appears to be no more than an extractor fan?

    If you want something to ventilate the house, don't you ideally need something that does ventilation with heat recovery?

    If you do go down the dehumidifier route, for the love of God do not by an Ebac. They're supposed to be the best but mine is terrible. I used to use a desiccant-based dehumidifier which worked great until the heater failed. I bought a compressor-based Ebac to replace it and it's nowhere near as good. Like you I keep the house at around 18/19C and it's just not warm enough for a dehumidifier that relies on condensation onto cooling plates to work efficiently. I'd buy another desiccant-based device but I just can't face spending even more money after getting the Ebac.
    Right, I hate being this guy not giving the whole story. So here is the other half and a lot of my own questions are answered. They sent me two products. One is called the atmos air, this atmos air also costs £1400 for a full survey and installation. Basically they survey your house, place the new unit it the loft, and run a duct to your landing, this system pulls fresh air from the loft and circulates it through the home. Since the air circulates it helps reduce the amount of stale air in the house, while also aiding cooling in the summer. I just hope it doesn't let in enough cold air that its like having a window open.

    So a whole system should help but its a great cost. I was wondering if anyone had had the system installed. (there being a million bulb customers means there is a high chance maybe a member has a system installed.)

    I think the system works by making a positive pressure in the home and thus expelling pollutants.

    In other news I was planning on getting some lime render installed so the house breathes more so damp can't accumulate.

    I thought this whole system was an intresting thing to share with other bulb members. Hence the everything but bulb thread.
  • I just hope it doesn't let in enough cold air that its like having a window open.

    This would be my primary concern. I'm afraid I know nothing about these systems so I can't offer any advice, but I can't imagine what you're proposing will work well in the winter without some form heat exchanger to prevent all the expensive heat you've put into the house being lost.
  • yytyyt
    edited February 7


    In other news I was planning on getting some lime render installed so the house breathes more so damp can't accumulate.

    There are a lot of really good (genuinely) breathable interior paints around that are perfect for damp walls. For some reason most of the decorators I've met are keen to use vinyl products 'to keep the damp in'.
  • Hooloovoo said:

    I just hope it doesn't let in enough cold air that its like having a window open.

    This would be my primary concern. I'm afraid I know nothing about these systems so I can't offer any advice, but I can't imagine what you're proposing will work well in the winter without some form heat exchanger to prevent all the expensive heat you've put into the house being lost.
    It depends on how and where it draws the air from I suppose.

    Because its already recirculating warm air that would otherwise escape out of the house. Its moving air in the house so it doesn't get stale. I'd like to talk to someone who has the system.
  • yyt said:


    In other news I was planning on getting some lime render installed so the house breathes more so damp can't accumulate.

    There are a lot of really good (genuinely) breathable interior paints around that are perfect for damp walls. For some reason most of the decorators I've met are keen to use vinyl products 'to keep the damp in'.
    I suppose its more likely to do with how thick it goes on. The breathable stuff will be much thinner and harder to apply. The other stuff will be like wallpaper paste and spray a lot less.
  • I use a desiccant-based dehumidifier in the kitchen as I dont have extraction to the outside. Hardly comes other than when cooking or wife hangs a washing on the clothes horse. It probably extracts 2 or 3 litres every month or so. I had no real reason to get one other than my wife never opens a window when steaming pots are on the hob.
  • @FromTheValleys I think it's because they don't appreciate that letting the water escape through the walls gives you a less damp house than if you try to try contain it within the wall by sealing it in.

    I find that the breathable paints are actually much nicer to apply and cover better than the conventional ones.
  • Because its already recirculating warm air that would otherwise escape out of the house. Its moving air in the house so it doesn't get stale.

    Is it? In that case, that's not ventilation.

    According to this page it's just a fancy extraction fan. Is that the correct product?

    The Cyclone 7 incorporates the latest patented cyclone separation technology. This ensures that all particles, humidity and dust in the air are drawn into the fan and extracted outside the property, without the need for filters that can become clogged. This enables the fan to deliver the maximum of performance to control moisture and humidity using the lowest energy consumption.
  • edited February 8
    The two things I've had brochures for are the atmos system and the cyclone 7, the former being the loft based system, the others being an extractor fan. @Hooloovoo
  • The two things I've had brochures for are the atmos system and the cyclone 7, the former being the loft based system, the others being an extractor fan. @Hooloovoo

    Ah, sorry, I obviously missed that and didn't realise we were talking about two products. I was just going on "the product is called the enviro vent cyclone 7 for interest" and then didn't read your longer post properly with the different name. Sorry.

    Ok, it's this one.

    This is still just a ceiling mounted fan heater with an air filter. No way is it worth £1400. On page 18 of the installation manual it says it uses up to 9 Watts which will cost £10.93 per year to run at 15p per kWh. But there's a big caveat here. That wattage is with the "comfort heater function" disabled, so in the winter it'll be blowing freezing cold air from your loft into your home, which doesn't seem much use. Page 7 says that in the summer above 25C it'll switch off to avoid blowing hot air into your home, which again doesn't seem much use. It doesn't seem to say how much power the comfort heater uses, but safe to say it'll be a few hundreds of Watts in order to actually do anything.

    I wouldn't waste your money on this.
  • edited February 9
    yyt said:


    In other news I was planning on getting some lime render installed so the house breathes more so damp can't accumulate.

    There are a lot of really good (genuinely) breathable interior paints around that are perfect for damp walls. For some reason most of the decorators I've met are keen to use vinyl products 'to keep the damp in'.
    Also lime plaster internally. Modern gypsum plaster does not let walls breath in the same way that lime does.

    If you've not currently got render outside, and the bricks themselves are not damaged, don't render. Whatever render it is, it's going to breath less well than the wall itself.
    Fixing gutters/new pointing tends to be the correct solution.
    scudo said:

    I dont know of the system but wouldn't a dehumidifier sort the moisture problem.

    A house should not need a dehumidifier - I own one and use it sometimes in the basement but it's used to remove moisture that has entered over the last decade due to rotten guttering rather than the basement inherently being damp. If you think you need a dehumidifer, find out where the moisture is coming from and how you can stop/reduce it first.


    If you can smash apart your house to install the ducting and can afford it, a ventilation and heat recovery system is the way to go.

    Something like the https://www.envirovent.com/products/heat-recovery-ventilation-mvhr/energisava-200/

    You can get those for less than £1300 and they'll actually do something.
  • If you think you need a dehumidifer, find out where the moisture is coming from and how you can stop/reduce it first.

    The answer is my wifes cooking, its like the inside of a steam boiler at meal times, I am sure she is trying to reinvent the steam engine, I dont think she realizes that James Watts old workshop is just 100 yards across the road and has been there and done it. :)

  • mowcius said:

    yyt said:


    In other news I was planning on getting some lime render installed so the house breathes more so damp can't accumulate.

    There are a lot of really good (genuinely) breathable interior paints around that are perfect for damp walls. For some reason most of the decorators I've met are keen to use vinyl products 'to keep the damp in'.
    Also lime plaster internally. Modern gypsum plaster does not let walls breath in the same way that lime does.

    If you've not currently got render outside, and the bricks themselves are not damaged, don't render. Whatever render it is, it's going to breath less well than the wall itself.
    Fixing gutters/new pointing tends to be the correct solution.
    scudo said:

    I dont know of the system but wouldn't a dehumidifier sort the moisture problem.

    A house should not need a dehumidifier - I own one and use it sometimes in the basement but it's used to remove moisture that has entered over the last decade due to rotten guttering rather than the basement inherently being damp. If you think you need a dehumidifer, find out where the moisture is coming from and how you can stop/reduce it first.


    If you can smash apart your house to install the ducting and can afford it, a ventilation and heat recovery system is the way to go.

    Something like the https://www.envirovent.com/products/heat-recovery-ventilation-mvhr/energisava-200/

    You can get those for less than £1300 and they'll actually do something.
    I have render on the house already. I was replacing it as its very tired.

    I have a damp proofer sorting out out a problem in the kitchen, once that's sorted render and ventilation and a new kitchen.
  • edited February 10

    I have a damp proofer sorting out out a problem in the kitchen, once that's sorted render and ventilation and a new kitchen.

    Just make sure that if they make any mention of a failed damp proof course or rising damp, you get rid of them and find someone else who actually knows what they're talking about.

    Injection damp proof courses are a complete scam and damp proof courses in almost all situations are not actually required as rising damp (through bricks and mortar) basically doesn't exist.
    https://www.heritage-house.org/damp-and-condensation/managing-damp-in-old-buildings.html

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9E63vIgV9Oo&feature=youtu.be&t=309

  • mowcius said:

    I have a damp proofer sorting out out a problem in the kitchen, once that's sorted render and ventilation and a new kitchen.

    Just make sure that if they make any mention of a failed damp proof course or rising damp, you get rid of them and find someone else who actually knows what they're talking about.

    Injection damp proof courses are a complete scam and damp proof courses in almost all situations are not actually required as rising damp (through bricks and mortar) basically doesn't exist.
    https://www.heritage-house.org/damp-and-condensation/managing-damp-in-old-buildings.html

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9E63vIgV9Oo&feature=youtu.be&t=309

    It's a damp course that has failed. It's being fixed for free so it isn't all bad.
  • edited February 10

    mowcius said:

    I have a damp proofer sorting out out a problem in the kitchen, once that's sorted render and ventilation and a new kitchen.

    Just make sure that if they make any mention of a failed damp proof course or rising damp, you get rid of them and find someone else who actually knows what they're talking about.

    Injection damp proof courses are a complete scam and damp proof courses in almost all situations are not actually required as rising damp (through bricks and mortar) basically doesn't exist.
    https://www.heritage-house.org/damp-and-condensation/managing-damp-in-old-buildings.html

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9E63vIgV9Oo&feature=youtu.be&t=309

    It's a damp course that has failed. It's being fixed for free so it isn't all bad.
    Yeah, have a read of that page I linked and a watch a few videos and see whether you actually believe that afterwards.

    Damp proof courses can fail all they like, but if they don't do anything in the first place, it doesn't really matter.

    It's almost certainly another thing causing your damp problems.
    Have they done a carbide test to show that the wall itself (internally) is damp, or are they just wasting their time based on a hunch (or worse, a high spikey damp meter reading)?
  • mowcius said:

    mowcius said:

    I have a damp proofer sorting out out a problem in the kitchen, once that's sorted render and ventilation and a new kitchen.

    Just make sure that if they make any mention of a failed damp proof course or rising damp, you get rid of them and find someone else who actually knows what they're talking about.

    Injection damp proof courses are a complete scam and damp proof courses in almost all situations are not actually required as rising damp (through bricks and mortar) basically doesn't exist.
    https://www.heritage-house.org/damp-and-condensation/managing-damp-in-old-buildings.html

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9E63vIgV9Oo&feature=youtu.be&t=309

    It's a damp course that has failed. It's being fixed for free so it isn't all bad.
    Yeah, have a read of that page I linked and a watch a few videos and see whether you actually believe that afterwards.

    Damp proof courses can fail all they like, but if they don't do anything in the first place, it doesn't really matter.

    It's almost certainly another thing causing your damp problems.
    Have they done a carbide test to show that the wall itself (internally) is damp, or are they just wasting their time based on a hunch (or worse, a high spikey damp meter reading)?
    I've had the full report done, what's happened is because the house is on two levels it's seeping from the upper level as it drops to the kitchen.
  • mowcius said:

    Injection damp proof courses are a complete scam and damp proof courses in almost all situations are not actually required as rising damp (through bricks and mortar) basically doesn't exist.
    https://www.heritage-house.org/damp-and-condensation/managing-damp-in-old-buildings.html

    That's an excellent page. Thanks for posting!

    I've been resistant to have cavity wall insulation done due to the potential damp problems. Do you have any advice on that?
  • edited February 10

    I've had the full report done, what's happened is because the house is on two levels it's seeping from the upper level as it drops to the kitchen.

    So, you have a damp proof course to stop moisture falling down the wall?

    A full report can still be a load of nonsense.
    Hooloovoo said:

    I've been resistant to have cavity wall insulation done due to the potential damp problems. Do you have any advice on that?

    It's a tricky subject. I presume you're talking blown in cavity insulation.

    A cavity stops/reduces the transferral of moisture through to the internal wall. If you insulate it, moisture can potentially bridge across, and any moisture that happens to get on the internal skin directly cannot evaporate off into the cavity as easily/at all. As internally modern gypsum plasters basically kill the wall's breathability from that side, water can then become trapped.

    In practice it rarely seems to be a problem. You can have walls externally sprayed/painted with a breathable hydroscopic coating (or lime rendered...) which should stop driving rain getting in, and without any other issues (leaky gutters, too high a ground level outside etc.) all should be fine and dry.

    Personally I'm internally insulating but I don't have a cavity as such, just a double brick skin.
  • mowcius said:

    I've had the full report done, what's happened is because the house is on two levels it's seeping from the upper level as it drops to the kitchen.

    So, you have a damp proof course to stop moisture falling down the wall?

    A full report can still be a load of nonsense.
    Hooloovoo said:

    I've been resistant to have cavity wall insulation done due to the potential damp problems. Do you have any advice on that?

    It's a tricky subject. I presume you're talking blown in cavity insulation.

    A cavity stops/reduces the transferral of moisture through to the internal wall. If you insulate it, moisture can potentially bridge across, and any moisture that happens to get on the internal skin directly cannot evaporate off into the cavity as easily/at all. As internally modern gypsum plasters basically kill the wall's breathability from that side, water can then become trapped.

    In practice it rarely seems to be a problem. You can have walls externally sprayed/painted with a breathable hydroscopic coating (or lime rendered...) which should stop driving rain getting in, and without any other issues (leaky gutters, too high a ground level outside etc.) all should be fine and dry.

    Personally I'm internally insulating but I don't have a cavity as such, just a double brick skin.
    My course is to prevent rising damp. It needs tanking again is what they've said. Its covered under the guarantee. It'll be fixed, this is the biggest company in the valleys of South Wales and they've done my property before, and several in the street.
  • almost all situations are not actually required as rising damp (through bricks and mortar) basically doesn't exist.
    I dont have enough knowledge to debate that however what I can say is I had a house abroad and most of the houses were single skin. Almost to a house over winter when they would have 2 months of heavy rain there would be a creeping dampness which would reach a level approx 18 inches above ground level. In almost every case the dampness was vastly reduced or eliminated by proper ventilation.
    Although my house was empty over winter I had exterior shutters that allowed me to discretely keep some windows open over winter, allowing air circulation.
    This pretty much cured the `damp` issue.
  • @scudo, in those circumstances, it's typically that water is driving directly onto the wall (which naturally ends up near the bottom), and water is splashing off surfaces close to the exterior walls to a height of a foot or so. Bricks and mortar are moisture permeable so water will go into them when it rains, and that which doesn't evaporate off will naturally travel downwards through/on the outside of the wall.

    In those situations, a lime render would traditionally be applied to stop the direct contact of water onto the bricks but still allow the wall to breath from the outside.

    Better ventilation will help in all cases of damp, but it's not always people's preferred method! It worked well when everyone had roaring fires with draughty houses, but everyone wants airtight houses and low energy heating methods these days.
  • mowcius said:

    Better ventilation will help in all cases of damp, but it's not always people's preferred method! It worked well when everyone had roaring fires with draughty houses, but everyone wants airtight houses and low energy heating methods these days.

    I get condensation problems in my bathroom because I don't have any extraction. In the summer it's fine because I can leave the window open. In the winter, leaving the window open is not an option because it's too cold, but interestingly ventilation makes the problem worse anyway because cold air can hold less water and has a higher relative humidity. I just keep the windows closed and run a dehumidifier.
  • @Hooloovoo, so many people don't seem to get that concept.
    If you open a window in the bathroom, you need positive pressure to push the moisture out and bring in warm dry air from the rest of the house. As you say, bringing in cold air from outside doesn't help much!

    I just let the moisture travel into the rest of the house. I have such huge draughts from the eaves upstairs and the basement downstairs that I've never had any issue with condensation. It's something I'm keeping a close eye on with my renovations though.
    I've been considering a heat recovery system though as I have some eaves space above my bathroom, and could relatively easily take extraction pipes down to the kitchen and return pipes down to the basement from there.
  • mowcius said:

    I just let the moisture travel into the rest of the house.

    Yes, same here, we just leave the door open when showering and run a dehumidifier on the landing.

    Luckily it's just me and the missus at home so it doesn't matter about leaving the bathroom door open =) :3
  • Plenty of things can be done to reduce internal condensation it’s all about getting the heating and humidity at the right levels, but if you can’t manage this due to lifestyle etc then I presume you are looking at fitting a dry master or something similar,basically a unit which pushes positive pressure into the house.Ive had ones fitted in various problem properties and the definitely work. very simple installation,the basic version has the running cost about the same as leaving a light bulb on, the preheat version would cost more and dearer to run.If your getting quoted more than £700 then your being ripped off.
  • @Seatrout100, I wonder what the payback period is for the difference between a PIV system and a MVHR system.

    Probably quite a long time if you're using gas central heating.
  • Have a look at the Nuaire Drimaster PIV. We use one of these in the loft and it has been fantastic. It keeps the air fresh and if the loft temp falls below 10degC heats the air to this level and then blows it into the house. This obviously happens a lot in the Winter and on this setting I estimate it costs about 7p and hour. Summer costs are negligible - around 1-2p per hour. We used to get lots of condensation on the windows upstairs but now get none. I have just googled the Nuaire and it's coming it at around £283-£340 plus fitting by a qualified electrician. Should take 2-3 hours max. Downstairs we use a Meaco Zambezi dehumidifier - again a great piece of kit especially for drying clothes in the Winter, gobbling up excess cooking moisture and generally monitoring humidity levels. our mid 1930's 4 bed detached now has no condensation or high humidity issues, levels being around the 50-55% mark.
  • @JC1905, how many people are living in your house? I'm always interested by how high people's humidity levels seem to be. Even in my attic bedrooms where I have some damp issues the humidity in the room never goes above about 55%.
  • Just two. To be honest I'm sceptical about the readings on domestic hygrometers. I have two standalone sensors and there is a built in sensor in the Meaco and they all provide different readings. At first I was quite obsessive about this but I'm now happy that the approach I'm using is fine because I actually have no window condensation and no resulting mould spores anywhere in the house.
  • edited April 5
    I have about 5 and they all provide very similar readings, but they're all the same type.

    I also question their absolute accuracy so only really use them to compare rooms and different times. I can tell when a room is too moist by how it feels and the amount of condensation on cold surfaces. Living in the UK without any air-con, my rooms are never too dry.
  • Hi All we have have a vent Axia sentinel mhvr system installation in our bungalow consists of a loft or cupboard mounted unit and inlet or extract vents in all rooms. It uses 30w typically and 200w on max (when shower or cooker on). Had it for a few years now and works brilliantly. If the outside air is 7 degrees cooler than your set temp Eg 21 degrees set 14 degrees or above outside the heat recovery from extracting the stale air from the house is used to heat the incoming fresh air from outside and the temp is maintained at 21 degrees automatically. Of course if it’s cooler outside it will head as much as it can only.

    From my experience to date it was well worth fitting house gets 3 full air changes every hour you feel no draughts and we haven’t opened a window since it was fitted !
  • Hanksy said:

    Hi All we have have a vent Axia sentinel mhvr system installation in our bungalow consists of a loft or cupboard mounted unit and inlet or extract vents in all rooms. It uses 30w typically and 200w on max (when shower or cooker on). Had it for a few years now and works brilliantly. If the outside air is 7 degrees cooler than your set temp Eg 21 degrees set 14 degrees or above outside the heat recovery from extracting the stale air from the house is used to heat the incoming fresh air from outside and the temp is maintained at 21 degrees automatically. Of course if it’s cooler outside it will head as much as it can only.

    From my experience to date it was well worth fitting house gets 3 full air changes every hour you feel no draughts and we haven’t opened a window since it was fitted !

    I can endorse the above. Have been running a similar Vent Axia whole house system for 6 years now. Absolutely brilliant. Maintains RH at 50% throughout the whole house and an interesting benefit has been that it also reduces the amount of dust in the atmosphere through extraction as well as filtering pollen from the incoming air. Downside though is you know it if someone close by has lit a bonfire or emptied a septic tank :-(
  • JC1905 said:

    Have a look at the Nuaire Drimaster PIV. We use one of these in the loft and it has been fantastic. It keeps the air fresh and if the loft temp falls below 10degC heats the air to this level and then blows it into the house. This obviously happens a lot in the Winter and on this setting I estimate it costs about 7p and hour. Summer costs are negligible - around 1-2p per hour. We used to get lots of condensation on the windows upstairs but now get none. I have just googled the Nuaire and it's coming it at around £283-£340 plus fitting by a qualified electrician. Should take 2-3 hours max. Downstairs we use a Meaco Zambezi dehumidifier - again a great piece of kit especially for drying clothes in the Winter, gobbling up excess cooking moisture and generally monitoring humidity levels. our mid 1930's 4 bed detached now has no condensation or high humidity issues, levels being around the 50-55% mark.

    Don't know if this thread is still relevant but I also have the Nuaire system installed (self install). I didn't opt for the heated one and dont find it too much of an issue tbh. The results are great. I live in a 1930's house that had condensation issues as there are six of us in the house. When this PIV is running there are no issues at all.

    Highly recommend it.

    Martyn.
  • @Maidney interesting proposition.

    Have you noticed a subsequent increase in heating costs due to fresh and cold air being brought in from outside?
  • Pugliese said:

    Downside though is you know it if someone close by has lit a bonfire or emptied a septic tank :-(

    Do they do any activated carbon filter options for the incoming air filters?
    Running the system constantly they'd probably need replacing every 3 months or so, but that might be a small price to pay to have far healthier air in your house.
    I swapped the crummy pollen filter in my work van for an activated carbon filter and it's made a world of difference. I get almost zero smells from outside into the cabin now, even when I'm sat behind an old bus belching out black smoke.
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