ho can I contact to get a new meter box installed?

Hi I have a outdoor gas meter and the lock on the box has perished and now the door won’t stay shut. Who can I contact to get a new box installed? Thanks.

Hi I have a outdoor gas meter and the lock on the box has perished and now the door won’t stay shut. Who can I contact to get a new box installed? Thanks.

The meter box is a customers responsibility, if you do a search of the internet there are various companies who provide replacement parts for meter boxes.

Hi I have a outdoor gas meter and the lock on the box has perished and now the door won’t stay shut. Who can I contact to get a new box installed? Thanks.

The meter box is a customers responsibility, if you do a search of the internet there are various companies who provide replacement parts for meter boxes.

How did you come to that conclusion?

How did you come to that conclusion?

From memory (doesn’t always work) . There was a discussion about this on the forum a little while ago, on this occasion I didn’t bother to do a search. I’ll do this now to see if I can find the thread,

The search doens’t produce enough threads for me to locate the thread I had in mind. As a substitute please see: http://www.ritherdon.co.uk/responsible-repair-meter-box/

The search doens't produce enough threads for me to locater the thread I had in mind. As a substitute please see: http://www.ritherdon.co.uk/responsible-repair-meter-box/

That post didn’t really help, IEE regulations are not enforceable pieces of legislation but professional code of conduct with in the industry.

This is just a think out loud comment: If energy suppliers are responsible for the meter they must be responsible for the safe enclosing of the meter and any enclosures they erect to keep the meter safe, thinking about product safety laws, consumer protection laws, the supply and sale of goods and services act 1982, sale of goods act 1979 and possibly the common law of contract principles of the supply and goods and/or services.

Not only did that post look at the wrong law and seems to have quoted the incorrect parts., but also misinterprets the word 'kept in an orderly manner. When you rent a property you are to keep it in an order manner, or look after to make sure it is in a habitable condition within the confines of a tenants, that doesn’t mean a tenant is reasonable for fixing the walls or foundations which was not at the fault of the tenant for the property being needed repaired.

Gas Act 1986 Schedule 2B Section 3 (1), describes that the consumer must keep the meter at his own expense, that would mean keeping it in a manner that would not put the meter at risk of needing repair at the fault of the consumers negligence, (ie not throwing water over it, not kicking it, not deliberately damaging the meter), but dusting it, cleaning it would be at the cost to the consumer and the consumer could not seek compensation for such acts.

The section goes further Section 3(3) describes that the gas supplier will, at no charge to the consumer, keep any meter owned by the supplier in proper order for correctly registering the quantity of gas supplied.

In both these provisions, both the supplier and consumer have responsible to keep the meter, we also need to take into account the concept of basic contract law of lease, where the owner is responsible for the repair of certain damage while, the leasee is also responsible for the repair of certain damage, and it is that key concept which type of damage has occurred to whom is responsible to repair. Common sense has to prevails that general wear and tear, and damage at no fault of the consumer must be repaired by the owner, and damaged caused by the leasee must be repaired by the leasee.

If no one is certain if the meter is owned by the consumer or the supplier, again common sense prevails to tell us that the supplier is the owner unless there is evidence to the contrary (i.e. a contract of sale or massive contract that gifts the meter etc).

I am trained in Scottish law, and I have used a lot of Scottish terminologies, and that could cause a confusion with English law terminology.

@JustSsavvy

Do these links help:

https://customerservices.npower.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/1451/~/my-meter-box-%2F-meter-box-door-needs-replacing-%2F-repairing.-what-should-i-do%3F

https://edfenergyuk.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/817/~/the-box-my-meter-is-in-is-broken.-who’s-responsibility-is-this%3F

https://www.ukpowernetworks.co.uk/internet/en/our-services/replace-meter-box/

http://www.ayrshire-gasworks.co.uk/gas-supply.html

https://meteroperators.org.uk/faqs/

None of that really helps, that is the position of the energy supplier.

And clearly there is no impartial evidence that seems to confirm that, or any proper analysis of why that position is the case.

there is nothing in legislation saying that the box/enclosure is a fixture of the property and is the ownership of the property owner.

Technically the meters are fixtures of the property, and without evidence to the contrary the ownership to the meters and the enclosures are the suppliers. as there is nothing in the legislation stating the ownership of the meters, it is assumed that they are, as a course of dealings when energy was privatised.

@JustSsavvy

I would have thought the energy suppliers would have had legal advice to be able to say the customer is responsible for the meter box, otherwise by now one savvy customer or Citizen Advice or some other consumer organisation would have challenged this in a court of law.

@JustSsavvy

I would have thought the energy suppliers would have had legal advice to be able to say the customer is responsible for the meter box, otherwise by now one savvy customer or Citizen Advice or some other consumer organisation would have challenged this in a court of law.

They may have had legal advice, or they might have done the normal human thing and do well everyone else does this, and assume some form of practice, that doesn’t make the practice right in law. You will be surprised that legal advice will differ from source to source, not every solicitor will agree with an interpretation of the law. There are many examples of companies deliberately trying to flaunt the law cause the principle of getting caught, and being exposed in court is limited. PPI and Mis-selling energy at the door step all had legal advice and turns out wrong, there are concept of unfair contract terms in T&C but most wont challenge due to the cost outweighs the benefit. The UK Home Office gave legal advice to enforcement agencies if enforcement officers didn’t give a reason for deportation it would most likely not be challenge, legal advice takes many forms including the risk of challenge.

Furthermore, Challenging these things in court is expensive compared to the cost of replacing/repairing over the concept of principles. In Scotland to raise a writ in Court would cost a min £95.00, that doesn’t include any of the other costs that could incur to proceed with the process, £250 a day for hiring the court to hear legal debates and evidence, £45.00 to submit a motion to be heard on legal arguments and evidence, research costs, photocopying cost, need supply 3 copies of everything. It is expensive.

Most likely Citizens Advice is limited on its resources, and most are not legally trained, advisers get their information from a centralised information database, which has not explored this issue, and may be considered trivial on all the circumstances compared to other issues that need dealing with.