Monthly payments

Just wondering what people averagely pay for a 2 bed semi detached. We are home all the time due to young children and I feel I’m paying a little to much compared to other companies. Iv not yet had any problems with bulb so don’t want to change over but with such a high monthly payment I may have to.

The high monthly payment doesn’t mean that’s how much gas and electricity you are using its the monthly payment are that you are adding into to make sure you have enough money for the winter months. You could always decrease your monthly payments however you may find you’ve not enough money for the bigger winter bills. I generally use about £40.00 per month elec but hardly any gas in summer however I’ve set my monthly payments to £80.00 to cover winter payments of gas that will be higher throughout the winter months

Hi @Char2232 you can always generate a quick quote for yourself here: https://join.bulb.co.uk

Then go to ‘refine quote’ and ‘I’ don’t know my usage’ and they have the exact questions you mention there. Put in your answer to them and the quote will be generated.

As you’re already a member I’m sorry that you’ve been a little more than you’d like. You can always compare our tariff prices found in your online account.

I feel I’m paying a little to much compared to other companies.

You need to compare actual unit rates (pence per kWh) and standing charge (pence per day).

Comparing only what any supplier guesses that you might need to pay per month will lead to disappointment. Once you’ve done that, and determined that you’re with the cheapest supplier and the cheapest tariff for your area, if your bills (actual statement bills based on meter readings, not the monthly payment) are still too high then at that point you have only one option left - use less electricity and gas.

You need to compare actual unit rates (pence per kWh) and standing charge (pence per day).

Checking the unit rates and standing charges is only one part of the equation, the other is the average daily energy use (in kWh).

One supplier may have higher unit costs and lower standing charges than Bulb but it is only when you include average daily energy use can you work out the crossover point between the two suppliers.

Checking the unit rates and standing charges is only one part of the equation, the other is the average daily energy use (in kWh).

One supplier may have higher unit costs and lower standing charges than Bulb but it is only when you include average daily energy use can you work out the crossover point between the two suppliers.

Absolutely. But then you have to start doing maths and considering your own typical usage. For someone that possibly doesn’t yet even understand the basics of unit rate and standing charge, I feel this is a complication too far in encouraging them to learn more about how their energy is billed.

I’m sure you agree getting someone to consider unit rates and standing charges, rather than simply estimated monthly payment, is a huge step forward even if they don’t yet finesse their understanding with the granularity of usage calculations. As you say, you need to run the numbers to determine the crossover point between the two or three cheapest suppliers, but you typically don’t need that level of detail to determine the difference between the upper and lower half of the table (i.e., the difference between the big-6 and the “others”).