Smart meters & the smart tariff

I keep getting emails about switching to a smart meter and I’m not opposed to them having had them in the past with Ovo. However, I’m not keen on the smart tariff at first glance. My wife and I both work from home and our entire house runs on electric: Hot water, heating (electric flow boiler with wet underfloor heating, albeit with some unheated rooms). Consequently are bills are pretty hefty and sadly we cannot switch to oil or gas for both logistical and cost reasons. We haven’t been in the house a year yet so I don’t know what the average bill will be but I’m currently paying over £300/month as I think this will comfortably cover our usage. However this all means we are in the ouse and using power at the peak time of 4-7 every day, and that’;s when we’ll be cooking etc. Given the price per kWh is close to three times the standard price at this time but really not much below standard outside this time I’m not keen to be on it, on the face of it.

The question is, will this tariff become the norm if you have a smart meter? If so, then I worry that it would cost me even more so I would have to switch away. Are there any indications that this is the case, or will the standard fixed rate still be available for those who want it? If the standard tariff remains available and you can switch freely between them then it’s not a problem: The plan then would be to get the smart meter, monitor usage and the do some calculations to see how it might affect us. If it is favourable then I could switch and see and if not then stay on the standard tariff. My energy costs a fortune as it is, I really don’t need to be paying more, especially in one of the most expensive regions for power!

The question is, will this tariff become the norm if you have a smart meter?

No.

Although people could well be “encouraged” onto multi-rate time-of-use tariffs in the future simply by single-rate tariffs becoming prohibitively expensive. Note this also includes single-rate tariffs without a smart meter, so avoiding having smart meters installed likely wont help.

Of course, as more people switch to electric vehicles and de-gas their properties, the benefits of multi-rate tariffs far outweigh any downsides. It’s a good thing in the long run.

One problem you will have is extracting your half-hourly readings from Bulb in order to do the analysis you require. Several of us on here are still trying to obtain access to our own data.

One problem you will have is extracting your half-hourly readings from Bulb in order to do the analysis you require. Several of us on here are still trying to obtain access to our own data.

Interesting. I would have thought that was a pretty basic prerequisite since you should be entitled to view your own usage data. I’m assuming that would be down to implementation problems (I have pretty long experience of such projects from a software perspective). Maybe I’ll just let them get on and install the meter and keep an eye on the usage gizmo you get in the house (I’m assuming you actually get one of those). Oddly my team leader today had a Bulb smart meter fitted and I found out only after posting this so I must chat to him about his experiences.

No issue getting your data, submit a Sar and bulb have 14 days to comply.

No issue getting your data, submit a Sar and bulb have 14 days to comply.

Have you tried that and had success? If so, how did they supply your meter data?