What can Bulb offer the Electric Car owner?

I have just ordered a BMW i3 which is about as ‘eco’ as you can get, using recycled materials where possible and totally electric. So now I am a Bulb customer it seems the next step is to benefit from lower electricity charging costs as per Ecotricity customers. They get a 50% reduction in car charging rate. When will Bulb customers benefit from their ‘responsible attitude’ to the planet by getting a reduced tariff at charging stations that Bulb has negotiated with the suppliers? I do not expect Bulb to install their own charge points of course - but there is room for Bulb to encompass a wider eco market.

Congrats on the car, I pick up my first PHEV next month.

I doubt this will happen any time soon (I may be wrong), and I don’t think it needs to.

“Ecotricity customers receive a 50% discount on the Electric Highway – paying just 15p per kWh, with no connection fee or monthly subscription. For the average user, that’s roughly a £50 saving every year***.”

I can’t think of a scenario where you’d save money with Ecotricity vs charging at home overnight (E7), and even paying full price rapid prices (which is hopefully rarely) it’s cheaper than petrol/diesel.

@wetspecs, as someone who doesn’t own a car and purchased a house specifically for good public transport links, I’d rather Bulb stick to their roots and keep providing cheap renewable energy to all.

I doubt Buld could negotiate any reduction in prices for those using car charging stations without handing over some serious cash. Money which would have to come from somewhere, increasing costs for all customers.

Ecotricity are expensive anyway, so even paying full price on car chargers, I suspect you’d still save a load over actually being with them.
Refer one person to Bulb and you’ve already made up the £50 Ecotricity think you might save on charging costs.

@wetspecs and @mowcius and @phproxy to me, the most exciting aspect of the electric car <> renewable electricity ecosystem is the time-of-use tariffs that incentivise overnight electric car charging. These incentives theoretically also even out electricity demand, which has benefits for grid stability and thus enable greater renewable penetration on a more stable grid.

Bulb has ambitions to do interesting things with time-of-use tariffs once we’ve rolled out smart meters to most of our customers. This is a 2-4 year strategy, rather than something we’re looking at for 2018.

The most exciting aspect for me is that I could make some money from V2G!

But that’s a few years away yet.

@wetspecs and @mowcius and @phproxy to me, the most exciting aspect of the electric car <> renewable electricity ecosystem is the time-of-use tariffs that incentivise overnight electric car charging. These incentives theoretically also even out electricity demand, which has benefits for grid stability and thus enable greater renewable penetration on a more stable grid.

Bulb has ambitions to do interesting things with time-of-use tariffs once we’ve rolled out smart meters to most of our customers. This is a 2-4 year strategy, rather than something we’re looking at for 2018.

Good to hear. Maybe in 4 years time, Powerwall’s / similar home batteries will have also dropped significantly in price, making time of use shifting economically viable, too.